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CDC influenza surveillance report no. 43, February 19, 1959
  • Published Date:
    February 19, 1959
Filetype[PDF - 1.61 MB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Communicable Disease Center (U.S.), Influenza Surveillance Unit.
  • Series:
    CDC influenza surveillance report ; no. 43
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    I. Summary of information -- II. Current analysis of influenza and pneumonia mortality -- III. Influenza in Europe - January and February, 1959 -- IV. Current status of influenza in the United States

    "During the latter part of January and the first two weeks of February, 1959, influenza has spread through at least eight countries of Europe. In the USSR only A/Asian strain isolations have been reported to date. In England the majority of isolates have been type B, but some A/Asian and type C isolates have also been obtained. Elsewhere only type B influenza has been detected. The influenzal illnesses have been generally mild, with very low associated mortality. School children and young adults have most often been affected. The type B strain appears to be sufficiently closely related to the Great Lakes 1950 strain of B used in American polyvalent influenza vaccine so that this vaccine would be protective should type B influenza from Europe be heavily introduced into this country. In the United States febrile respiratory illness has occurred recently in the District of Columbia, and adjacent counties of Maryland and Virginia. Type B influenza viruses have been isolated from four persons with respiratory illness in Maryland and Michigan, and one A/Asian strain was recently isolated in New York City from a recent returnee from Europe. The B strain in Maryland cross-reacts well with the Great Lakes 1950 strain of B which is incorporated in presently available polyvalent influenza vaccines. Increased school absenteeism and several school outbreaks due to respiratory disease have occurred in seven Eastern states in the past two weeks. Mortality due to influenza and pneumonia in the United States was at a normal seasonal level for the week ending February 14 in all areas the West South Central Division. In this division, however, the figure was well below that of three weeks ago. The Surgeon General has recommended that physicians consider vaccination in the near future of certain special risk groups and with polyvalent influenza vaccine (all vaccines presently available contain both the A/Asian strain and the B/Great Lakes strain). Influenza type B epidemics of the past in the United States have occurred in 1936, 1940, and 1945-46, in 1951, also, type B was more than usually prevalent. If influenza type B were to become at all widespread in this country in March it would be the first extensive type B occurrence in about thirteen years." - p. 2

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files