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CDC influenza surveillance report no. 21, October 15, 1957
  • Published Date:
    October 15, 1957
Filetype[PDF - 6.77 MB]


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CDC influenza surveillance report no. 21, October 15, 1957
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Communicable Disease Center (U.S.), Influenza Surveillance Unit.
  • Series:
    CDC influenza surveillance report ; no. 21
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    I. Summary of information -- II. Maps and tables -- III. Epidemic and case reports -- IV. Current influenza and pneumonia mortality -- V. Reports of influenza-associated deaths -- VI. Industrial absentee data -- VII. Influenza vaccine and distribution -- Appendix A: Supplementary report: International spread of Asian strain influenza -- Appendix B: The Influenza epidemic of 1889-90

    "Influenza has now been reported in 397 counties, including 68 counties which appear to have community-wide spread. Active epidemics are occurring in several large metropolitan areas such as Chicago, Milwaukee, Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Washington, New York, and Boston. The first evidence of epidemic influenza in these cities was increased school absenteeism, and there is reason to believe that high and junior high schools were first involved. The new industrial absentee reporting system, inaugurated in this report, shows an increase in absenteeism in a number of cities, which thus far seems to follow the onset of school epidemics in these cities by one or two weeks. Evidence of increased mortality from influenza or pneumonia appears somewhat later. Several regions show excess mortality this week, and it is probable that this excess will prevail until the epidemic has run its course. Through October 7, a total of 15,628, 921 ml of Asian strain vaccine has been released. This includes 2,123,974 ml released between October 1 and October 7. Two more influenza-associated deaths have been reported, one in a 72-year-old cardiac patient and the other in a a60-year-old man, who died of staphylococcal pneumonia. This makes a total of 23 reported deaths associated with influenza, but the excess mortality figures indicate that influenza may be causing other deaths which are not being reported as such. A supplementary international summary is appended to this report. The spread of Asian strain influenza throughout the world during the late summer and September is discussed. During the past month Europe and North America have become heavily involved. Spread has continued in South and Central America and Africa. Except for outlying areas such as New Zealand and the islands of Oceania, epidemic influenza has disappeared from most parts of Asia. There is serological evidence that the 1889-90 influenza pandemic may have been caused by a strain of virus similar to the present Asia strain. The appended epidemiological description of the 1889 epidemic reveals that it had a high morbidity and relatively low mortality. In the New England area attach rates of 40% were common. Pneumonia was the most frequent complication and deaths occurred most often in the very young or the very old." - p. [2]

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