STD testing among pregnant women in the United States, 2011-2015
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STD testing among pregnant women in the United States, 2011-2015
  • Published Date:

    February 2020

  • Source:
    Sex Health. 17(1):1-8
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-93.95 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Sex Health
  • Description:
    Introduction: Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are increasing in the United States. Pregnant women and infants are susceptible to serious STD-related sequelae; however, some STDs can be cured during pregnancy with appropriate, timely screening. Methods: We used data from the 2011–2015 National Survey of Family Growth to examine STD testing (in the past 12 months) among women who were pregnant in the past 12 months (n=1,155). In bivariate and multivariable analyses, we examined associations between demographics, health care access and two outcome variables – receipt of chlamydia test and receipt of other STD test. Results: Among women who were pregnant in the past 12 months, 48% reported receiving a chlamydia test and 54% reported that they received a STD test other than chlamydia in the past 12 months. In adjusted analyses, non-Hispanic black women were more likely to receive a chlamydia test (aOR=2.82, 1.86–4.26) and other STD test (aOR=2.43, 1.58–3.74) than non-Hispanic white women. Women living in a metropolitan statistical area but not the principal city were less likely to report chlamydia (aOR=0.62, 0.44–0.86) and other STD testing (aOR=0.57, 0.40–0.81) than women living in a principal city. Women born outside of the U.S. were significantly less likely to have received a chlamydia test (aOR=0.35, 0.19–0.64) or other STD test (aOR=0.34, 0.20–0.58) while those who had received prenatal care were more likely to receive a chlamydia test (aOR=2.10, 1.35–3.28) or other STD test (aOR=2.32, 1.54–3.49). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that interventions are needed to increase adherence to recommended STD screenings during pregnancy.
  • Pubmed ID:
    31677644
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7078010
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