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Hepatitis B Screening and Vaccination Behaviors among a Community-based Sample of Chinese and Korean Americans in New York City
  • Published Date:
    Mar 01 2017
  • Source:
    Am J Health Behav. 41(2):204-214.


Public Access Version Available on: March 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    28452698
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5472990
  • Description:
    Objectives

    As Asian Americans are disproportionately affected by the hepatitis B virus (HBV), this study explores predictors of HBV screening and vaccination among Chinese and Korean Americans.

    Methods

    This study uses cross-sectional data from a community-based sample of Chinese Americans (N = 502) and Korean Americans (N = 487) residing in the metropolitan New York City area from 2008–2009. Logistic regression models were stratified by Asian American subgroup and sex to predict HBV screening (among the entire sample) and HBV vaccination (among those not HBV positive).

    Results

    Overall, screening rates were high (71.3% among Chinese and 70.1% among Koreans). The majority of respondents were aware of HBV; however, knowledge about HBV transmission was low. In logistic regression, a physician recommendation was consistently associated with HBV screening and vaccination outcomes across all groups; having heard of HBV was significantly associated with screening and vaccination among Chinese males and screening among Korean males and females. Screening and vaccination barriers were reported among all groups, and include lack of knowledge and feeling well/having no health issues.

    Conclusions

    Targeted efforts in these at-risk communities are necessary in order to improve HBV knowledge, address misinformation about HBV, and eliminate provider-, patient-, and resource-related barriers to HBV screening and vaccination.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    UL1 TR001445/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    U58 DP001022/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U48 DP005008/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U58 DP005621/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    P60 MD000538/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
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