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URINARY MELATONIN IN RELATION TO POSTMENOPAUSAL BREAST CANCER RISK ACCORDING TO MELATONIN 1 RECEPTOR STATUS
  • Published Date:
    Nov 09 2016
  • Source:
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 26(3):413-419.


Public Access Version Available on: March 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    28151704
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5336486
  • Funding:
    P01 CA087969/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 OH009803/OH/NIOSH CDC HHS/United States
    UM1 CA186107/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Background

    Urinary melatonin levels have been associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, but this association might vary according to tumor melatonin 1 receptor (MT1R) expression.

    Methods

    We conducted a nested case-control study among 1,354 postmenopausal women in the Nurses’ Health Study, who were cancer free when they provided first-morning spot urine samples in 2000–2002; urine samples were assayed for 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s, a major metabolite of melatonin). Five-hundred fifty-five of these women developed breast cancer before May 31, 2012, and were matched to 799 control subjects. In a subset of cases, immunohistochemistry was used to determine MT1R status of tumor tissue. We used multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression to estimate the relative risk (RR) of breast cancer (with 95% confidence intervals [CI]) across quartiles of creatinine-standardized urinary aMT6s level, including by MT1R subtype.

    Results

    Higher urinary melatonin levels were suggestively associated with a lower overall risk of breast cancer (multivariable-adjusted RR=0.78, 95% CI=0.61–0.99, comparing quartile 4 vs. quartile 1; p-trend=0.08); this association was similar for invasive vs. in situ tumors (p-heterogeneity=0.12). There was no evidence that associations differed according to MT1R status of the tumor (e.g., p-heterogeneity for overall breast cancer=0.88).

    Conclusion

    Higher urinary melatonin levels were associated with reduced breast cancer risk in this cohort of postmenopausal women, and the association was not modified by MT1R subtype.

    Impact

    Urinary melatonin levels appear to predict the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. However, future research should evaluate these associations with longer-term follow-up and among premenopausal women.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files