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Association Between Maternal Multivitamin Use and Preterm Birth in 24 States, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 2009–2010
  • Published Date:
    Sep 2016
  • Source:
    Matern Child Health J. 20(9):1825-1834.
Filetype[PDF - 727.00 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27209294
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5007159
  • Description:
    Objectives

    The study objective was to examine the prevalence of maternal multivitamin use and associations with preterm birth (<37 weeks gestation) in the United States. We additionally examined whether associations differed by race/ethnicity.

    Methods

    Using the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, we analyzed 2009–2010 data among women aged ≥18 years with a singleton live birth who completed questions on multivitamin use 1 month prior to pregnancy (24 states; n = 57,348) or in the last 3 months of pregnancy (3 states, n = 5,095).

    Results

    In the month prior to pregnancy, multivitamin use ≥4 times/week continued to remain low (36.8 %). In the last 3 months of pregnancy, 79.6 % of women reported using multivitamins ≥4 times/week. Adjusting for confounders, multivitamin use 1–3 times/week or ≥4 times/week prior to pregnancy was not associated with preterm birth overall. Though there was no evidence of dose response, any multivitamin use in the last 3 months of pregnancy was associated with a significant reduction in preterm birth among non-Hispanic black women.

    Conclusions

    Multivitamin use during pregnancy may help reduce preterm birth, particularly among populations with the highest burden, though further investigations are warranted.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
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