Bullying and absenteeism : information for state and local education agencies
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Bullying and absenteeism : information for state and local education agencies

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      In the United States, bullying remains a serious problem among teens. Although associations between bullying and health risk behaviors are well-documented, research on bullying and education-related outcomes, such as school attendance, is limited. CDC researchers used the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) to examine associations between bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns. Given increasing attention to electronic bullying, this study considered in-person bullying at school, electronic bullying, and the co-occurrence of both types of bullying. The findings reported in this info brief were published in: Steiner RJ, Rasberry CN. Brief Report: Associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among U.S. high school students. J Adolesc. 2015;43:1-4. CS258962 fs_bullying_absenteeism.pdf Publication date from document properties.
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