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Comparing a knowledge-driven approach to a supervised machine learning approach in large-scale extraction of drug-side effect relationships from free-text biomedical literature
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25860223
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4402591
  • Description:
    Background

    Systems approaches to studying drug-side-effect (drug-SE) associations are emerging as an active research area for both drug target discovery and drug repositioning. However, a comprehensive drug-SE association knowledge base does not exist. In this study, we present a novel knowledge-driven (KD) approach to effectively extract a large number of drug-SE pairs from published biomedical literature.

    Data and methods

    For the text corpus, we used 21,354,075 MEDLINE records (119,085,682 sentences). First, we used known drug-SE associations derived from FDA drug labels as prior knowledge to automatically find SE-related sentences and abstracts. We then extracted a total of 49,575 drug-SE pairs from MEDLINE sentences and 180,454 pairs from abstracts.

    Results

    On average, the KD approach has achieved a precision of 0.335, a recall of 0.509, and an F1 of 0.392, which is significantly better than a SVM-based machine learning approach (precision: 0.135, recall: 0.900, F1: 0.233) with a 73.0% increase in F1 score. Through integrative analysis, we demonstrate that the higher-level phenotypic drug-SE relationships reflects lower-level genetic, genomic, and chemical drug mechanisms. In addition, we show that the extracted drug-SE pairs can be directly used in drug repositioning.

    Conclusion

    In summary, we automatically constructed a large-scale higher-level drug phenotype relationship knowledge, which can have great potential in computational drug discovery.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    DP2HD084068/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    R25 CA094186-06/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 RR024989/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
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