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Diet and lifestyle factors modify immune/inflammation response genes to alter breast cancer risk and prognosis: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25332681
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4201121
  • Funding:
    1U58 DP000807-01/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    CA078552/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    CA078682/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    CA078762/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    CA078802/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    CA14002/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    CA63446/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    CA77305/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    HHSN261201000036C/PHS HHS/United States
    N01-PC-67000/PC/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA063446/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA078552/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA078682/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA078762/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA078802/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA140002/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R03 CA121875/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are important mediators of inflammation. We examined 10 of these genes with respect to breast cancer risk and mortality in a genetically admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Additionally, we explored if diet and lifestyle factors modified associations with these genes. Overall, these genes (collectively) were associated with breast cancer risk among women with >70% NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.0008), with TLR1 rs7696175 being the primary risk contributor (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.25, 2.51). Overall, TLR1 rs7696175 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03, 1.91; P(adj) = 0.032), TLR4 rs5030728 (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.30, 2.95; P(adj) = 0.014), and TNFRSF1A rs4149578 (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.28, 5.76; P(adj) = 0.029) were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. We observed several statistically significant interactions after adjustment for multiple comparisons, including interactions between our dietary oxidative balance score and CD40LG and TNFSF1A; between cigarette smoking and TLR1, TLR4, and TNF; between body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women and TRAF2; and between regular use of aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TLR3 and TRA2. In conclusion, our findings support a contributing role of certain TNF-α and TLR genes in both breast cancer risk and survival, particularly among women with higher NA ancestry. Diet and lifestyle factors appear to be important mediators of the breast cancer risk associated with these genes.