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CRISPR-Cas systems for genome editing, regulation and targeting
  • Published Date:
    Mar 02 2014
  • Source:
    Nat Biotechnol. 32(4):347-355.
Filetype[PDF - 1.13 MB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24584096
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4022601
  • Funding:
    DP1 GM105378/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    DP1 GM105378/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
    R01 GM088040/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
    R01 GM088040/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases has rapidly gone from being a niche technology to a mainstream method used by many biological researchers. This widespread adoption has been largely fueled by the emergence of the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) technology, an important new approach for generating RNA-guided nucleases, such as Cas9, with customizable specificities. Genome editing mediated by these nucleases has been used to rapidly, easily and efficiently modify endogenous genes in a wide variety of biomedically important cell types and in organisms that have traditionally been challenging to manipulate genetically. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression or label specific genomic loci in living cells. Although the genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 systems remain to be fully defined, the power of these systems to perform targeted, highly efficient alterations of genome sequence and gene expression will undoubtedly transform biological research and spur the development of novel molecular therapeutics for human disease.