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Maps of diagnosed diabetes and obesity in 1994, 2000, and 2010
  • Published Date:
    November 2011
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 480.73 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (U.S.). Division of Diabetes Translation.
  • Description:
    The maps display the age-adjusted prevalence of obesity and diagnosed diabetes among US adults aged 18 years or older in 1994, 2000, and 2010.

    In 1994, almost all states had prevalence of obesity less than 18%. In 2000, only 13 states had a prevalence of less than 18%, and 11 states exceeded 22%. In 2010, no state had a prevalence of less than 18%; almost all states exceeded 22% and 32 of these states exceeded 26%.

    Similarly, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was less than 6% in almost all states in 1994. In 2000, approximately half of the states had a prevalence of less than 6%. By 2010, no state had a prevalence of less than 6% and 15 states exceeded 9%.

    The prevalence of obesity and diagnosed diabetes among US adults aged 18 years or older were determined using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), available at http://www.cdc.gov/brfss. An ongoing, yearly, state-based telephone survey of the non- institutionalized adult population in each state, the BRFSS provides state-specific information on behavioral risk factors for disease and on preventive health practices. Respondents who reported that a physician told them they had diabetes (other than during pregnancy) were considered to have diagnosed diabetes. Self reported weight and height were used to calculate body mass index (BMI): weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. A BMI greater than or equal to 30 was considered to be obese. Rates were age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population based on age groups 18–44, 45–64, 65–74, and 75 years or older.

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