Racial and ethnic differences in COVID-19 hospitalizations by metropolitan status among Medicare beneficiaries, 1 January–31 December 2020
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Racial and ethnic differences in COVID-19 hospitalizations by metropolitan status among Medicare beneficiaries, 1 January–31 December 2020

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  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      J Public Health (Oxf)
    • Description:
      Background Risk for COVID-19 hospitalizations increases with increasing age and presence of underlying medical conditions. However, the burden has not been well-assessed in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas by race/ethnicity among Medicare population with chronic conditions. Methods We used the 2020 Medicare data to estimate COVID-19 hospitalization rates by race/ethnicity among Medicare beneficiaries for COVID-19 by metropolitan status and to assess the association of hospitalizations from COVID-19 with each of selected 29 chronic conditions for patients by metropolitan status and by race/ethnicity. Results The COVID-19 hospitalization rate was higher among beneficiaries residing in nonmetropolitan counties than those residing in metropolitan counties in 2020. Approximately 1 in 2 AI/AN, 1 in 3 NHB, Hispanic and A/PI, and 1 in 4 NHW beneficiaries with COVID-19 residing in nonmetropolitan counties were hospitalized. Beneficiaries with COVID-19 and chronic conditions were more likely to be hospitalized compared with those without chronic conditions. Conclusions Hospitalization rates among beneficiaries with COVID-19 and chronic conditions were not distributed equally by race/ethnicity and by metropolitan status. Researchers, policymakers and practitioners can use these findings to explore more effective ways of reducing racial/ethnic and geographic disparities among minorities disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and are at highest risk of hospitalization.
    • Pubmed ID:
      34611709
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC8980106
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