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A comparison between ignition behaviours of 7 different UK and World-Traded coals in air, and in a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases representative of oxy-combustion conditions
  • Published Date:
    1/1/2009
Filetype[PDF-242.61 KB]


Details:
  • Description:
    A 20L ignition test chamber has been used to test suspensions of 7 UK and world traded coals in air and O2/CO2 mixtures typical of oxy-combustion conditions. The coals varied in rank from sub-bituminous to bituminous and were tested in varying concentrations from the ignition limit to 400g/m3. Following each successful test the combustion residue was collected, weighed and analysed within a thermogravimetric analyser, allowing Q factors to be estimated. The ignition limit varied slightly in air, but was mostly around the 200g/m3 level. With the exception of Coal C, which was much harder to ignite, it correlated roughly with coal rank. The ignition limit changed significantly with O2 concentration when in mixed O2/CO2 gases. Only a few high volatile coals ignited in 21% O2/CO2 v/v, and then only with a 2500 J, rather than a 1000J, igniter. An increase in O2/CO2 levels to 30 or 35% gave ignition patterns similar to those carried out in air with a further increase to 40% having little additional effect. In addition the minimum ignition concentration decreased with increase in O2. Heterogeneous combustion or gasification of the coal by CO2 appears to be confirmed by comparing weight loss results for air and O2/CO2 mixtures respectively for an equivalent peak pressure rise.

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