The role of health information technology in care coordination in the US
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The role of health information technology in care coordination in the US

  • Published Date:

    Feb 2015

  • Source:
    Med Care. 53(2):184-190
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-109.32 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Med Care
  • Description:
    Objectives: Examine the extent to which office-based physicians in the United States receive patient health information necessary to coordinate care across settings and determine if receipt of information needed to coordinate care is associated with use of health information technology (HIT), as measured by use of an electronic health record (EHR) system and electronic sharing of clinical data. Study design: Cross-sectional study using the 2012 National Electronic Health Records Survey. Subjects: Office-based physicians. Measures: Use of HIT and three types of patient health information needed to coordinate care. Results: In 2012, 64% of physicians routinely received the results of a patient’s consultation with a provider outside of their practice while 46% routinely received a patient’s history and reason for a referred consultation from a provider outside of their practice. About 54% of physicians reported routinely receiving a patient’s hospital discharge information. Significant differences in receiving necessary information were observed by use of HIT. Compared with those not using HIT, a higher percentage of physicians using HIT received results of a patient’s outside consultation and of a patient’s history and reason for a referral from providers outside their practice. Among physicians routinely receiving information needed for care coordination, the majority did not receive the information electronically. Conclusions: Although a higher percentage of physicians using HIT received patient information necessary for care coordination than those who did not use HIT, more than one-third did not routinely receive the needed patient information at all.
  • Pubmed ID:
    25464164
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7472643
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