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Comorbid Depression and Obesity: Correlates and Synergistic Association With Noncommunicable Diseases Among Australian Men
  • Published Date:
    July 02 2020
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 2020; 17
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-511.31 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Prev Chronic Dis
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Obesity and depression are among the leading causes of disease worldwide. Their bidirectional relationship often results in comorbid depression and obesity, which further increases the risk of adverse health outcomes. Further evidence is needed on the correlates and synergistic association with other noncommunicable diseases. The objective of our study was to examine the correlates and synergistic association of comorbid depression and obesity with other noncommunicable diseases in a large sample of Australian men.

    Methods

    Our cross-sectional study used data on 13,763 men aged 18 to 55 from the first wave (2013–2014) of the Australian Ten to Men study. Body mass index was calculated from self-reported weight and height. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was used to assess depression. We calculated the weighted prevalence of depression, obesity, and comorbid depression and obesity and examined correlates of comorbid depression and obesity by using logistic regression. We used the synergy index to measure the synergistic association of depression and obesity with other noncommunicable diseases.

    Results

    The weighted prevalence of depression, obesity, and comorbid depression and obesity among Australian men were 12.5%, 22.2%, and 3.7%, respectively. Age, marital status, area-level socioeconomic index, educational attainment, household income, employment status, and physical activity were significantly associated with comorbid depression and obesity. Men with comorbid depression and obesity, compared with men without comorbid depression and obesity, had 7.6 times the risk of diabetes and 6.7 times the risk of hypertension.

    Conclusion

    Co-occurrence of depression and obesity among Australian men is associated with a set of individual- and area-level correlates and a higher risk of noncommunicable diseases. The correlates identified in our study are useful in planning interventions and screening in primary care settings.

  • Pubmed ID:
    32614771
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7367080
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