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Safe Distances For Blasting Wiring From Commonly Encountered Underground Electromagnetic Energy Sources - 1.1 Introduction
  • Published Date:
    9/1/1983
Filetype[PDF - 2.26 MB]


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  • Description:
    1.1 BACKGROUND In many underground coal mining operations the use of electromagnetic field equipment, particularly communication systems, not only increases the overall efficiency of the mining operation but can be directly linked with mine safety considerations. The use of electromagnetic field producing equipment in underground coal mining operations can only be expected to grow. Several new communication systems have already been proposed. In addition, high-frequency producing equipments for many diverse uses in mining operations are under study. The use of these equipment in underground mining operations is hampered by the possibility of their electromagnetic fields interacting with the electric blasting cap operations commonly carried out in the mines. Such interactions can have at least two results bearing directly on mine safety: o premature initiation of the cap, either in its normal shot location or during hookup or transportation; o dudding of the cap so that normal firing operations do not cause irritation; thereby leaving unexploded high explosives after normal firing. Since the consequences of a premature initiation could, particularly in coal mines operations, result in catastrophe involving human life, the overall approach to prediction of possible hazard must be, as far as possible, of a "worst case" nature. The general problem of predicting possible RF hazards for any electroexplosive device (EED) is best treated by reference to Appendix A of

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