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Geographic co-occurrence of mesothelioma and ovarian cancer incidence
  • Published Date:
    July 16 2019
  • Source:
    J Womens Health (Larchmt). 29(1):111-118
  • Language:
    English


Public Access Version Available on: January 01, 2021, 12:00 AM information icon
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Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    J Womens Health (Larchmt)
  • Description:
    Background:

    Asbestos is an established cause of several cancers, including mesothelioma and ovarian cancer. Incidence of mesothelioma, the sentinel asbestos-associated cancer, varies by state, likely reflecting different levels of asbestos exposure. We hypothesized that states with high mesothelioma incidence may also have high ovarian cancer incidence.

    Materials and Methods:

    Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Program for Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, we examined the geographic co-occurrence of mesothelioma and ovarian cancer incidence rates by U.S. state for 2003–2015.

    Results:

    By state, mesothelioma incidence ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 cases per 100,000 persons and ovarian cancer incidence ranged from 9 to 12 cases per 100,000 females. When states were grouped by quartile of mesothelioma incidence, the average ovarian cancer incidence rate was 10% higher in states with the highest mesothelioma incidence than in states with the lowest mesothelioma incidence. Ovarian cancer incidence tended to be higher in states with high mesothelioma incidence (Pearson correlation r =0.54; P<0.0001).

    Conclusions:

    Data from state cancer registries show ovarian cancer incidence was positively correlated with mesothelioma incidence, suggesting asbestos may be a common exposure.

    Impact:

    The potential for asbestos exposure has declined since the 1970s because fewer products contain asbestos; however, some products, materials, and buildings may still release asbestos and thousands of workers may be exposed. Ensuring that people are protected from exposure to asbestos in their workplaces, homes, schools, and communities may reduce the risk of several cancers.

  • Pubmed ID:
    31314677
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6962528
  • Document Type:
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