Welcome to CDC stacks | National and State Trends in Sudden Unexpected Infant Death: 1990–2015 - 79956 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
National and State Trends in Sudden Unexpected Infant Death: 1990–2015
  • Published Date:
    February 12 2018
  • Source:
    Pediatrics. 141(3)
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-636.35 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    29440504
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6637428
  • Description:
    BACKGROUND:

    Sharp declines in sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) in the 1990s and a diagnostic shift from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) to unknown cause and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed (ASSB) in 1999–2001 have been documented. We examined trends in SUID and SIDS, unknown cause, and ASSB from 1990 to 2015 and compared state-specific SUID rates to identify significant trends that may be used to inform SUID prevention efforts.

    METHODS:

    We used data from US mortality files to evaluate national and state-specific SUID rates (deaths per 100 000 live births) for 1990–2015. SUID included infants with an underlying cause of death, SIDS, unknown cause, or ASSB. To examine overall US rates for SUID and SUID subtypes, we calculated the percent change by fitting Poisson regression models. We report state differences in SUID and compared state-specific rates from 2000–2002 to 2013–2015 by calculating the percent change.

    RESULTS:

    SUID rates declined from 154.6 per 100 000 live births in 1990 to 92.4 in 2015, declining 44.6% from 1990 to 1998 and 7% from 1999 to 2015. From 1999 to 2015, SIDS rates decreased 35.8%, ASSB rates increased 183.8%, and there was no significant change in unknown cause rates. SUID trends among states varied widely from 41.5 to 184.3 in 2000–2002 and from 33.2 to 202.2 in 2013–2015.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Reductions in SUID rates since 1999 have been minimal, and wide variations in state-specific rates remain. States with significant declines in SUID rates might have SUID risk-reduction programs that could serve as models for other states.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Main Document Checksum:
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: