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Standing orders for influenza and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination: Correlates identified in a national survey of U.S. Primary care physicians
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    22433118
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3324392
  • Description:
    Background

    Standing orders programs (SOPs) allow non-physician medical staff to assess eligibility and administer vaccines without a specific physician's order. SOPs increase vaccination rates but are underutilized.

    Method

    In 2009, correlates of SOPs use for influenza vaccine and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPV) were assessed in a nationally representative, stratified random sample of U.S. physicians (n = 880) in family and internal medicine who provided office immunization. The response rate was 67%. Physicians reporting no SOPs, only influenza SOPs, and joint influenza and PPV SOPs were compared using multinomial and logistic regression models to examine individual and practice-level correlates.

    Results

    23% reported using SOPs consistently for both influenza vaccine and PPV, and 20% for influenza vaccination only, with the remainder not using SOPs. Practice-level factors that distinguished practices with joint influenza-PPV SOPs included perceived practice openness to change, strong practice teamwork, access to an electronic medical record, presence of an immunization champion in the practice, and access to nurse/physician assistant staff as opposed to medical assistants alone.

    Discussion

    Physicians in practices with SOPs for both vaccines reported greater awareness of ACIP recommendations and/or Medicare regulations and were more likely to agree that SOPs are an effective way to boost vaccination coverage. However, implementation of both influenza and PPV SOPs was also associated with a variety of practice-level factors, including teamwork, the presence of an immunization champion, and greater availability of clinical assistants with advanced training.

    Conclusions

    Practice-level factors are critical for the adoption of more complex SOPs, such as joint SOPs for influenza and PPV.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    KL2 TR000146/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    P30 AG024827/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
    U50 CD300-860-21/CD/ODCDC CDC HHS/United States
    UL1 RR024153/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 TR000005/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
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