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Preventing opportunistic infections after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Infectious Diseases Society of America, and American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Practice Guidelines and Beyond
  • Status:
    current
  • Source:
    Hematology / the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology. American Society of Hematology. Education Program. 2001; :392-421.
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Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
  • Description:
    This review presents evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of infection after blood and marrow transplantation. Recommendations apply to all myeloablative transplants regardless of recipient (adult or child), type (allogeneic or autologous) or source (peripheral blood, marrow or cord blood) of transplant. In Section I, Dr. Dykewicz describes the methods used to rate the strength and quality of published evidence supporting these recommendations and details the two dozen scholarly societies and federal agencies involved in the genesis and review of the guidelines. In Section II, Dr. Longworth presents recommendations for hospital infection control. Hand hygiene, room ventilation, health care worker and visitor policies are detailed along with guidelines for control of specific nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. In Section III, Dr. Boeckh details effective practices to prevent viral diseases. Leukocyte-depleted blood is recommended for cytomegalovirus (CMV) seronegative allografts, while ganciclovir given as prophylaxis or preemptive therapy based on pp65 antigenemia or DNA assays is advised for individuals at risk for CMV. Guidelines for preventing varicella-zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and community respiratory virus infections are also presented. In Section IV, Drs. Baden and Rubin review means to prevent invasive fungal infections. Hospital design and policy can reduce exposure to air contaminated with fungal spores and fluconazole prophylaxis at 400 mg/day reduces invasive yeast infection. In Section V, Dr. Sepkowitz details effective clinical practices to reduce or prevent bacterial or protozoal disease after transplantation. In Section VI, Dr. Sullivan reviews vaccine-preventable infections and guidelines for active and passive immunizations for stem cell transplant recipients, family members and health care workers.

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