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Adoption experiences of women and men, and demand for children to adopt by women ages 18-44 in the United States; data from the National Survey of Family Growth
  • Published Date:
    August 2008
Filetype[PDF - 1.59 MB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.), Division of Vital Statistics. ; University of Michigan.‏ ‎Institute for Social Research‏. ;
  • Pubmed ID:
    18956547
  • Series:
    Vital and health statistics. Series 23, Data from the national survey of family growth ; no. 27
    DHHS publication ; no. (PHS) 2008-1979
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    "Objective: This report presents national estimates of the prevalence of adoption for men and women 18-44 years of age, the demand for children to adopt by women, and women's preferences for characteristics of the adopted child. Methods: Analysis is based on data from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. This survey interviewed a nationally representative sample of women and men 15-44 years of age in their households. Results are weighted to produce national estimates of the characteristics of men and women who have adopted children, lifetime and current demand for adoption by women, and the characteristics of children preferred by women when they are considering adoption. Results: Adoption remains rare in the United States. Among all women aged 18-44 in 2002, only 1.1% had adopted a child and 1.6% were currently seeking to adopt. Womenweremorelikelytobecurrently seeking to adopt, to have ever sought to adopt, and to have actually adopted a child if they had used infertility services or had impaired fecundity. Older women and women who were in their second or later marriage were also more likely to have adopted a child. Hispanic and non-Hispanic black women were more likely to be currently seeking to adopt compared with non-Hispanic white women. More men than women have adopted children in their lifetimes. Among adopters, 17% of women and 6% of men were never married. Conclusions: Adopting a child has been and remains a relatively rare event in the United States. Adoption is a mechanism by which adults legalize their parental relationship to nonbiological children as well as a means to bring children into families. Studies examining adoption should include men as well as women and persons of all marital statuses." - p. 1

    "Cycle 6 (2002) of the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) was conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) with the support and assistance of a number of other organizations and individuals. Interviewing and other tasks were carried out by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research, under a contract with NCHS." - p. v

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files