Factors Predicting Client Re-Enrollment in Tobacco Cessation Services in a State Quitline
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Factors Predicting Client Re-Enrollment in Tobacco Cessation Services in a State Quitline
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  • Alternative Title:
    Prev Chronic Dis
  • Description:
    Introduction Quitlines are an integral part of tobacco treatment programs and reach groups of smokers who have a wide range of barriers to cessation. Although tobacco dependence is chronic and relapsing, little research exists on factors that predict the likelihood of clients re-engaging and reconnecting with quitlines for treatment. The objective of this study was to describe factors that predict the re-enrollment of clients in Arizona’s state quitline. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of data collected from clients (N = 49,284) enrolled in the Arizona Smokers’ Helpline from January 2011 through June 2016. We used logistic regression to analyze predictors of re-enrollment in services after controlling for theoretically relevant baseline variables (eg, nicotine dependence, smokers in the home) and follow-up variables (eg, program use, quit outcome). Results Compared with clients who reported being quit after their first enrollment, clients who reported not being quit were almost 3 times as likely to re-enroll (odds ratio = 2.89; 95% confidence interval, 2.54–3.30). Other predictors were having a chronic condition or a mental health condition, greater nicotine dependence, and lower levels of social support. Women and clients not having other smokers in the home were more likely to re-enroll than were men and clients not living with other smokers. Conclusion Understanding baseline and in-program factors that predict client-initiated re-enrollment can help quitlines tailor strategies to proactively re-engage clients who may have difficulty maintaining long-term abstinence.
  • Pubmed ID:
    30339773
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6198673
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