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Sustained Decrease in Laboratory Detection of Rotavirus after Implementation of Routine Vaccination — United States, 2000–2014
  • Published Date:
    Apr 10 2015
  • Source:
    MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015; 64(13):337-342.
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-395.40 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25856253
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4584623
  • Description:
    Rotavirus infection is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis among infants and young children worldwide. Before the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in the United States in 2006, rotavirus infection caused significant morbidity among U.S. children, with an estimated 55,000-70,000 hospitalizations and 410,000 clinic visits annually. The disease showed a characteristic winter-spring seasonality and geographic pattern, with annual seasonal activity beginning in the West during December-January, extending across the country, and ending in the Northeast during April-May. To characterize changes in rotavirus disease trends and seasonality following introduction of rotavirus vaccines in the United States, CDC compared data from CDC's National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS), a passive laboratory reporting system, for prevaccine (2000-2006) and postvaccine (2007-2014) years. National declines in rotavirus detection were noted, ranging from 57.8%-89.9% in each of the 7 postvaccine years compared with all 7 prevaccine years combined. A biennial pattern of rotavirus activity emerged in the postvaccine era, with years of low activity and highly erratic seasonality alternating with years of moderately increased activity and seasonality similar to that seen in the prevaccine era. These results demonstrate the substantial and sustained effect of rotavirus vaccine in reducing the circulation and changing the epidemiology of rotavirus among U.S. children.

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