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A survey to determine the prevalence and distribution of typhus in rats in Texas
  • Published Date:
    December 1951
  • Source:
    Waldrop RH, Ogden LJ. A survey to determine the prevalence and distribution of typhus in rats in Texas. CDC Bull. 1951 Sep;10(12):53-60
  • Series:
    CDC bulletin ; v. X, no. 12, p. 53-60
  • Language:
    English
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A survey to determine the prevalence and distribution of typhus in rats in Texas
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24536197
  • Description:
    The problem of typhus control in Texas and in the Nation has been the concern of public health personnel for some years. In 1945, the Texas State Department of Health started an extensive typhus control program with operational policies based primarily on the incidence of murine typhus fever in humans. This program consisted of dusting rat runs and harborages with 10 percent DDT plus rat poisoning. Ratproofing was begun in a few cities prior to 1945. In this beginning year, a large protion of the 1,844 human typhus cases was reported from the southern part of the State, but every section reported some cases.

    During the first years of typhus control operations, human typhus cases were widespread and the rat populations were universally heavy. By carrying on typhus vector and rodent control programs in counties reporting the larger number of cases, and by operating mostly in the urban areas, the incidence of human cases was reduced from 1,844 cases in 1945 to 222 in 1950. Because of this 88 percent reduction of human cases, and in order to concentrate on the remaining scattered typhus foci, it was apparent that future control operations should be carefully planned.

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