Depressive states among adults with diabetes: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2012
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Depressive states among adults with diabetes: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2012

  • Published Date:

    Feb 27 2017

  • Source:
    Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 127:80-88.
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-115.79 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Diabetes Res Clin Pract
  • Description:
    Aims To determine (1) the prevalence of SubD states among adults with diabetes, and (2) whether evidence exists of an independent association between diabetes status and SubD, controlling for selected confounders. Methods Data from the 2007–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were combined to estimates of depressive states by diabetes status among the noninstitutionalized U.S. adult population, and to assess the association of diabetes status and depressive states using a polytomous logistic regression model. Results An estimated 17%, or 3.7 million, of U.S. adults with diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) met criteria for either mD or ssD. The majority of SubD cases with diabetes were found to be ssD (10.1%) compared with mD (6.9%). After controlling for the effects of age, sex, race and ethnicity, education, body mass index, and poverty as covariates, an independent association persists between diagnosed diabetes and each SubD grouping (ssD: OR = 1.82, CIs 1.33, 2.47; mD: OR = 1.95, CIs 1.39, 2.74) compared with respondents having no diabetes. No association was found between depression and undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes compared with those having no diabetes. Conclusion Milder forms of depression such as ssD and mD are more extant than major depressive episodes among adults with diabetes. The odds that an adult with diagnosed diabetes meets the criteria for ssD or mD are higher by 80% and 95%, respectively, after controlling for age, sex, race and ethnicity, education, body mass index, and poverty factors when compared against adults with no diabetes.
  • Pubmed ID:
    28319805
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5820775
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