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Place of influenza vaccination among children—United States, 2010–11 through 2013–14 influenza seasons
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26850756
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5751425
  • Description:
    Background

    Studies are published on settings adults receive influenza vaccination but few have reported on settings children are vaccinated and how this might be changing over time or vary by socio-demographics.

    Methods

    Data from the National Immunization Survey-Flu were analyzed to assess place of influenza vaccination among vaccinated children 6 months–17 years during the 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, and 2013–14 influenza seasons. The percentage of children vaccinated at each place was calculated overall and by age, race/ethnicity, income, and Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).

    Results

    The places children received influenza vaccination varied little over four recent influenza seasons. From the 2010–11 through 2013–14 influenza seasons the percentage of vaccinated children receiving influenza vaccination at a doctor’s office was 64.1%, 65.1%, 65.3%, and 65.3%, respectively with no differences from one season to the next. Likewise, for vaccination at clinics or health centers (17.8%, 17.5%, 17.0%. 18.0%), health departments (3.2%, 3.6%, 3.0%, 2.8%), and other non-medical places (1.6%, 1.4%, 1.2%, 1.1%), there were no differences from one season to the next. There were some differences for vaccinations at hospitals, pharmacies, and schools. There was considerable variability in the place of influenza vaccination by age, race/ethnicity, income, and MSA. Fewer Hispanic children were vaccinated at a doctor’s office than black, white, and other or multiple race children and fewer black children and children of other or multiple races were vaccinated at a doctor’s office than white children. More children at or below the poverty level were vaccinated at a clinic or health center than all of the other income groups.

    Conclusion

    Most vaccinated children receive their influenza vaccination at a doctor’s office. Place of vaccination changed little over four recent influenza seasons. Large variability in place of vaccination exists by age, race/ethnicity, income, and MSA. Monitoring place of vaccination can help shape future immunization programs.

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