Government information systems to monitor complementary feeding programs for young children
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Government information systems to monitor complementary feeding programs for young children

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Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Matern Child Nutr
  • Description:
    Accelerating progress to improve complementary feeding of young children is a global priority. Strengthening monitoring through government information systems may increase the quality and implementation of infant and young child feeding (IYCF) programs. Monitoring is necessary for the effective implementation of programs as it allows program managers to assess program performance, identify problems, and take corrective action. Program descriptions and conceptual models explain how program inputs and activities should lead to outputs and outcomes, and ultimately public health impact; thus, they are critical tools when designing effective IYCF programs and monitoring systems as these descriptions and conceptual models form the basis for the program and are key for developing the monitoring system, indicators, and tools. Despite their importance, many programs do not have these documented, nor monitoring plans, limiting their ability to design effective programs and monitoring systems. Once in place, it is important to periodically review the monitoring system to confirm it still appropriately meets stakeholder needs and the data are being used to inform decision-making, and to make program adjustments as the monitoring focus, resources, or capacity may change during the program lifecycle. Including priority indicators of IYCF practices and counseling indicators in the government information systems may strengthen IYCF programs when the indicators are contextualized to the government IYCF program, capacity, and setting, and the indicators are used for decision-making and program improvement.
  • Pubmed ID:
    29032624
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5656999
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