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Regionalized PM2.5 Community Multiscale Air Quality model performance evaluation across a continuous spatiotemporal domain
  • Published Date:
    Jan 2017
  • Source:
    Atmos Environ (1994). 148:258-265.


Public Access Version Available on: January 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    28848374
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5571875
  • Description:
    The regulatory Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is a means to understanding the sources, concentrations and regulatory attainment of air pollutants within a model's domain. Substantial resources are allocated to the evaluation of model performance. The Regionalized Air quality Model Performance (RAMP) method introduced here explores novel ways of visualizing and evaluating CMAQ model performance and errors for daily Particulate Matter ≤ 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) concentrations across the continental United States. The RAMP method performs a non-homogenous, non-linear, non-homoscedastic model performance evaluation at each CMAQ grid. This work demonstrates that CMAQ model performance, for a well-documented 2001 regulatory episode, is non-homogeneous across space/time. The RAMP correction of systematic errors outperforms other model evaluation methods as demonstrated by a 22.1% reduction in Mean Square Error compared to a constant domain wide correction. The RAMP method is able to accurately reproduce simulated performance with a correlation of r = 76.1%. Most of the error coming from CMAQ is random error with only a minority of error being systematic. Areas of high systematic error are collocated with areas of high random error, implying both error types originate from similar sources. Therefore, addressing underlying causes of systematic error will have the added benefit of also addressing underlying causes of random error.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    R01 AG033078/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
    T32 ES007018/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    T42 OH008673/OH/NIOSH CDC HHS/United States
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
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