HIV-associated mortality in the era of antiretroviral therapy scale-up – Nairobi, Kenya, 2015
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HIV-associated mortality in the era of antiretroviral therapy scale-up – Nairobi, Kenya, 2015

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  • Alternative Title:
    PLoS One
  • Description:
    Background Declines in HIV prevalence and increases in antiretroviral treatment coverage have been documented in Kenya, but population-level mortality associated with HIV has not been directly measured. In urban areas where a majority of deaths pass through mortuaries, mortuary-based studies have the potential to contribute to our understanding of excess mortality among HIV-infected persons. We used results from a cross-sectional mortuary-based HIV surveillance study to estimate the association between HIV and mortality for Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya. Methods and findings HIV seropositivity in cadavers measured at the two largest mortuaries in Nairobi was used to estimate HIV prevalence in adult deaths. Model-based estimates of the HIV-infected and uninfected population for Nairobi were used to calculate a standardized mortality ratio and population-attributable fraction for mortality among the infected versus uninfected population. Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess sensitivity to epidemiological assumptions. When standardized to the age and sex distribution of expected deaths, the estimated HIV positivity among adult deaths aged 15 years and above in Nairobi was 20.9% (95% CI 17.7–24.6%). The standardized mortality ratio of deaths among HIV-infected versus uninfected adults was 4.35 (95% CI 3.67–5.15), while the risk difference was 0.016 (95% CI 0.013–0.019). The HIV population attributable mortality fraction was 0.161 (95% CI 0.131–0.190). Sensitivity analyses demonstrated robustness of results. Conclusions Although 73.6% of adult PLHIV receive antiretrovirals in Nairobi, their risk of death is four-fold greater than in the uninfected, while 16.1% of all adult deaths in the city can be attributed to HIV infection. In order to further reduce HIV-associated mortality, high-burden countries may need to reach very high levels of diagnosis, treatment coverage, retention in care, and viral suppression.
  • Pubmed ID:
    28767714
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5540587
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