Welcome to CDC Stacks | Measles and Rubella Seroprevalence Among HIV- Infected And Uninfected Zambian Youth - 44200 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Measles and Rubella Seroprevalence Among HIV- Infected And Uninfected Zambian Youth
  • Published Date:
    Mar 2017
  • Source:
    Pediatr Infect Dis J. 36(3):301-306.


Public Access Version Available on: March 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27879554
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5303148
  • Description:
    Background

    Measles and congenital rubella syndrome remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality despite available vaccines. HIV-infected youth may be at increased risk of measles because of greater waning immunity following vaccination. At a population level, they constitute a potentially large pool of susceptibles to measles and rubella. More data among HIV-infected youth in sub-Saharan Africa are needed to guide vaccination policy and control strategies.

    Methods

    This cross-sectional study was nested within two ongoing studies of malaria and HIV in Zambia. Dried blood spot cards from youth (5–15 years) in these studies from 2009–2013 were tested for IgG antibodies to measles and rubella viruses. HIV-uninfected youth, HIV-infected treatment-naïve youth, and HIV-infected youth receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) were compared.

    Results

    617 HIV-uninfected, 144 HIV-infected treatment-naïve, and 128 HIV-infected youth receiving ART were included in the study. The proportion seropositive for measles virus was significantly higher among HIV-uninfected youth (92.5%) compared to HIV-infected treatment-naïve youth (74.1%) and HIV-infected youth receiving ART (71.9%). No differences by age were observed. The proportion seropositive for rubella virus was significantly higher among HIV-uninfected youth (54.7%) compared with HIV-infected treatment-naïve youth (41.7%) and HIV-infected youth receiving ART (49.6%), with increases observed by age for all groups.

    Conclusions

    Measles seroprevalence was lower among HIV-infected than uninfected youth, consistent with waning immunity following measles vaccination. HIV-infected youth would likely benefit from revaccination. Half of all youth in rural Zambia were susceptible to rubella and may need targeting for catch-up rubella campaigns when measles-rubella vaccine is introduced.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    U19 AI089680/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
    U2G PS001930/PS/NCHHSTP CDC HHS/United States
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: