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The prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt 2015: implications for future policy on prevention and treatment
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27275625
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5145777
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Background & Aims

    In 2015, a national Egyptian health issue survey was conducted to describe the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this paper, we describe the HCV burden in 2015, compare the results with the national survey conducted in 2008, and discuss the implications of the new findings on prevention of HCV in Egypt.

    Methods

    A multistage probability sampling approach was used, similar to the national demographic survey conducted in 2008. More than 90% of sampled individuals complied with the interview and provided blood samples.

    Results

    In the 15–59‐year age groups, the prevalence of HCV antibody was found to be 10.0% (95% CI 9.5–10.5) and that of HCV RNA to be 7.0% (95% CI 6.6–7.4). In children, 1–14 years old, the prevalence of HCV antibody and HCV RNA were 0.4% (95% CI 0.3–0.5) and 0.2% (95% CI 0.1–0.3) respectively. Approximately, 3.7 million persons have chronic HCV infection in the age group 15–59 in 2015. An estimated 29% reduction in HCV RNA prevalence has been seen since 2008, which is largely attributable to the ageing of the group infected 40–50 years ago during the mass schistosomiasis treatment campaigns. Prevention efforts may have also contributed to this decline, with an estimated 75% (95% CI 6–45) decrease in HCV incidence in the 0–19 year age groups over the past 20 years.

    Conclusions

    These findings can be used to shape future HCV prevention policies in Egypt.