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Tuberculosis in Jails and Prisons: United States, 2002–2013
  • Published Date:
    Sep 15 2016
  • Source:
    Am J Public Health. 106(12):2231-2237.


Public Access Version Available on: December 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27631758
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5104991
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objectives

    To describe cases and estimate the annual incidence of tuberculosis in correctional facilities.

    Methods

    We analyzed 2002 to 2013 National Tuberculosis Surveillance System case reports to characterize individuals who were employed or incarcerated in correctional facilities at time they were diagnosed with tuberculosis. Incidence was estimated with Bureau of Justice Statistics denominators.

    Results

    Among 299 correctional employees with tuberculosis, 171 (57%) were US-born and 82 (27%) were female. Among 5579 persons incarcerated at the time of their tuberculosis diagnosis, 2520 (45%) were US-born and 495 (9%) were female. Median estimated annual tuberculosis incidence rates were 29 cases per 100 000 local jail inmates, 8 per 100 000 state prisoners, and 25 per 100 000 federal prisoners. The foreign-born proportion of incarcerated men 18 to 64 years old increased steadily from 33% in 2002 to 56% in 2013. Between 2009 and 2013, tuberculosis screenings were reported as leading to 10% of diagnoses among correctional employees, 47% among female inmates, and 42% among male inmates.

    Conclusions

    Systematic screening and treatment of tuberculosis infection and disease among correctional employees and incarcerated individuals remain essential to tuberculosis prevention and control.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files