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Foot complications and mortality: results from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26895355
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5094452
  • Description:
    Background

    Our objective was to study the impact of foot complications on 10 year mortality independent of other demographic and biological risk factors in a racially and socioeconomically diverse managed care population with access to high-quality medical care.

    Methods

    We studied 6,992 patients with diabetes in Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Foot complications were assessed using administrative claims data. The National Death Index was searched for deaths over 10 years of followup (2000–2009).

    Results

    Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy (CN) and diabetic foot ulcer with debridement (DFU) were associated with an increased risk of mortality; however, the associations were not significant in fully adjusted models. Lower extremity amputation (LEA) was associated with an increased risk of mortality in both unadjusted (HR 3.21, 95% CI 2.50–4.12) and fully adjusted models (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.28–2.63). When we examined the associations between LEA and mortality stratified by sex and race, risk was increased in men (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.25–3.07), Hispanics (HR 5.17, 95% CI 1.48–18.01), and Whites (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.37–3.47). In sensitivity analyses, minor LEA tended to increase the risk of mortality (HR 1.48, 95% CI 0.92–2.40) and major LEA was associated with a significantly higher risk of death at 10 years (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.18–3.01).

    Conclusions

    In this managed care population with access to high-quality medical care, LEA remained a robust independent predictor of mortality. The association was strongest in men and differed by race.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    U58 DP923530/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    P30 DK092926/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    P30DK020572/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    P30DK092926/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    P30 DK020572/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
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