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Application of the Rosner-Wei Risk-Prediction Model to Estimate Sexual Orientation Patterns in Colon Cancer Risk in a Prospective Cohort of U.S. Women
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24852207
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4098762
  • Funding:
    R01 CA050385/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    HL64108/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 DK059583/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    U48 DP001922/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    R01 CA067262/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    U01 CA067262/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA065725/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 HL064108/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    CA50385/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA067883/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Purpose

    We examined whether lesbian and bisexual women may be at greater risk of colon cancer (CC) than heterosexual women.

    Methods

    Working with a large cohort of U.S. women ages 25-64 years, we analyzed 20 years of prospective data to estimate CC incidence, based on known risk factors by applying the Rosner-Wei CC risk-prediction model. Comparing to heterosexual women, we calculated for lesbian and bisexual women the predicted one-year incidence rate (IR) per 100,000 person-years and estimated incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), based on each woman’s comprehensive risk factor profile.

    Results

    Analyses included 1,373,817 person-years of data from 66,257 women. For each sexual orientation group, mean predicted one-year CC IR per 100,000 person-years was slightly over 12 cases for each of the sexual orientation groups. After controlling for confounders in fully adjusted models and compared to heterosexuals, no significant differences in IRR were observed for lesbians (IRR 1.01; 95% CI 0.99, 1.04) or bisexuals (IRR 1.01; 95% CI 0.98, 1.04).

    Conclusions

    CC risk is similar across all sexual orientation subgroups, with all groups comparably affected. Health professionals must ensure that prevention, screening, and treatment programs are adequately reaching each of these communities.