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Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Disparities in Health-Related Quality of Life Among People With Coronary Heart Disease, 2007
  • Published Date:
    Jun 15 2011
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 2011; 8(4).
Filetype[PDF-700.60 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Prev Chronic Dis
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) refers to a person's or group's perceived physical and mental health over time. Coronary heart disease (CHD) affects HRQOL and likely varies among groups. This study examined disparities in HRQOL among adults with self-reported CHD.

    Methods

    We examined disparities in HRQOL by using the unhealthy days measurements among adults who self-reported CHD in the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System state-based telephone survey. CHD was based on self-reported medical history of heart attack, angina, or coronary heart disease. We assessed differences in fair/poor health status, 14 or more physically unhealthy days, 14 or more mentally unhealthy days, 14 or more total unhealthy days (total of physically and mentally unhealthy days), and 14 or more activity-limited days. Multivariate logistic regression models included age, race/ethnicity, sex, education, annual household income, household size, and health insurance coverage.

    Results

    Of the population surveyed, 35,378 (6.1%) self-reported CHD. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, Native Americans were more likely to report fair/poor health status (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.7), 14 or more total unhealthy days (AOR, 1.6), 14 or more physically unhealthy days (AOR, 1.7), and 14 or more activity-limited days (AOR, 1.9). Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanic whites to report fair/poor health status (AOR, 1.5) and less likely to report 14 or more activity-limited days (AOR, 0.5), and Asians were less likely to report 14 or more activity-limited days (AOR, 0.2). Non-Hispanic blacks did not differ in unhealthy days measurements from non-Hispanic whites. The proportion reporting 14 or more total unhealthy days increased with increasing age, was higher among women than men, and was lower with increasing levels of education and income.

    Conclusion

    There are sex, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in HRQOL among people with CHD. Tailoring interventions to people who have both with CHD and poor HRQOL may assist in the overall management of CHD.

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