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A data-driven allocation tool for in-kind resources distributed by a state health department
  • Published Date:
    Feb 18 2016
  • Source:
    Traffic Inj Prev. 17(7):681-685.
Filetype[PDF - 74.44 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26890693
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5024329
  • Description:
    Objective

    The objective of this study was to leverage a state health department’s operational data to allocate in-kind resources (children’s car seats) to counties, with the proposition that need-based allocation could ultimately improve public health outcomes.

    Methods

    This study used a retrospective analysis of administrative data on car seats distributed to counties statewide by the Georgia Department of Public Health and development of a need-based allocation tool (presented as interactive supplemental digital content, adaptable to other types of in-kind public health resources) that relies on current county-level injury and sociodemographic data.

    Results

    Car seat allocation using public health data and a need-based formula resulted in substantially different recommended allocations to individual counties compared to historic distribution.

    Conclusions

    Results indicate that making an in-kind public health resource like car seats universally available results in a less equitable distribution of that resource compared to deliberate allocation according to public health need. Public health agencies can use local data to allocate in-kind resources consistent with health objectives; that is, in a manner offering the greatest potential health impact. Future analysis can determine whether the change to a more equitable allocation of resources is also more efficient, resulting in measurably improved public health outcomes.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
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