Welcome to CDC Stacks | Effectiveness of the 2013 and 2014 Southern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines Against Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza in Young Children Using a Test-Negative Design, Bangkok, Thailand - 41328 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Effectiveness of the 2013 and 2014 Southern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines Against Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza in Young Children Using a Test-Negative Design, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Published Date:
    Oct 2016
  • Source:
    Pediatr Infect Dis J. 35(10):e318-e325.


Public Access Version Available on: October 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27307102
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5021558
  • Funding:
    U01 GH000152/GH/CGH CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Background

    The Thai Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends annual influenza vaccination for children six months through two years of age, although older children may be vaccinated on request. We evaluated effectiveness of the 2013 and 2014 inactivated influenza vaccines to reduce medically-attended laboratory-confirmed influenza illness among Thai children aged 7–60 months.

    Methods

    From September 2013–May 2015, children with influenza-like illness (ILI) were screened with a rapid influenza diagnostic test. Enrolled children had nasal and throat swabs tested for influenza viruses using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cases and controls were subjects testing positive and negative, respectively, for influenza viruses by PCR. Vaccination status was ascertained from vaccination cards. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated as 100%*(1−odds ratio of vaccination among cases versus controls).

    Results

    Of 1,377 children enrolled, cases (n=490) and controls (n=887) were similar in demographic characteristics. Cases were less likely to receive influenza vaccine than controls in 2013 (6% vs. 14%; p=0.02), but not in 2014 (6% vs. 7%; p=0.57). Among cases, 126 (26%) were positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, 239 (49%) for influenza A(H3N2) and 124 (25%) for influenza B. One specimen was positive for both influenza A(H3N2) and B viruses. VE for full vaccination against all viruses was 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21%, 84%) in 2013 and 26% (95% CI, −47%, 63%) in 2014.

    Conclusions

    Influenza vaccination was low among Thai children in our study, and VE varied by year, highlighting the need for annual monitoring of VE to better understand vaccine program effectiveness.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files