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Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010)
  • Published Date:
    Mar 31 2016
  • Source:
    Haemophilia. 22(4):604-614.


Public Access Version Available on: July 01, 2017 information icon
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Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    UNIVERSAL DATA COLLECTION JOINT OUTCOME WORKING GROUP, HEMOPHILIA TREATMENT CENTER NETWORK (HTCN) STUDY INVESTIGATORS
  • Pubmed ID:
    27030396
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4958548
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Recurrent joint hemarthroses due to hemophilia (Factor VIII and Factor IX deficiency) often lead to invasive orthopedic interventions to decrease frequency of bleeding and/or to alleviate pain associated with end-stage hemophilic arthropathy.

    Aim

    Identify trends in invasive orthopedic interventions among people with hemophilia who were enrolled in the Universal Data Collection (UDC) program during the period 2000–2010.

    Methods

    Data were collected from 130 hemophilia treatment centers in the United States annually during the period 2000–2010, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The number of visits in which an invasive orthopedic intervention was reported was expressed as a proportion of the total visits in each year of the program. Invasive orthopedic interventions consisted of arthroplasty, arthrodesis, and synovectomy. Joints included in this study were the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle.

    Results

    A 5.6% decrease in all invasive orthopedic interventions in all joints of people with hemophilia enrolled in the UDC program over the 11-year study period was observed.

    Conclusions

    These data reflect a declining trend in invasive orthopedic interventions in people with hemophilia. Further research is needed to understand the characteristics that may influence invasive orthopedic interventions.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files