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Functional outcomes following ankle arthrodesis in males with haemophilia: analyses using the CDC’s Universal Data Collection surveillance project
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Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    UNIVERSAL DATA COLLECTION JOINT OUTCOME WORKING GROUP and HEMOPHILIA TREATMENT CENTER NETWORK STUDY INVESTIGATORS
  • Pubmed ID:
    24629136
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4520238
  • Description:
    In persons with haemophilia (PWH), repeated ankle haemarthroses lead to pain, loss of joint range of motion (ROM), and limitations in activity and participation in society. PWH are offered ankle arthrodesis (AA) to eliminate pain. In our experience, PWH are hesitant to proceed to AA due to concerns regarding gait anomalies, functional decline and complete loss of ROM. The aim of this study was to report outcomes in ROM, assistive device (AD)/wheelchair use, activity scale and work/school absenteeism for participants in the CDC's Universal Data Collection surveillance project (UDC) pre- and post- AA. Males with haemophilia enrolled in the UDC with first report of AA (1998-2010) were selected. Descriptive statistics were calculated using data from the annual study visit pre-AA and the follow-up visit (~12-24 months) post-AA. The 68 subjects who fulfilled the criteria were: mean age 36.9 years (SD = 12.9); 85.3% white; 85.3% haemophilia A; 72% severe, 20.6% moderate; and 10.3% with inhibitor once during the study period. Mean loss in total arc of ankle motion was 17.02° (SD = 21.8, P ≤ 0.01) pre- compared to post-AA. For 61.8%, there was no change in use of AD for ambulation/mobility. For 85.3%, there was no change in use of a wheelchair. On a self-reported activity scale, 11.8% improved, 8.8% worsened and 79.4% did not change. Work/school absenteeism averaged 2.7 (SD = 6.4) pre- and 1.5 (SD = 6.4, P = 0.26) days per year post-AA. While ankle ROM was significantly reduced post-AA, for most subjects, there was no change in use of AD/wheelchair for ambulation/mobility. Physical activity was maintained and work/school absenteeism remained stable.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    AVU3/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
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