Welcome to CDC Stacks | Feasibility of Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment Enhanced with Peer Support and Mobile Health Technology for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness - 40161 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Feasibility of Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment Enhanced with Peer Support and Mobile Health Technology for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness
  • Published Date:
    Sep 2016
  • Source:
    Psychiatr Q. 87(3):401-415.


Public Access Version Available on: September 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26462674
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4929042
  • Funding:
    K12 HS021695/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States
    R01 MH089811/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    U48 DP005018/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objective

    Effective and scalable lifestyle interventions are needed to address high rates of obesity in people with serious mental illness (SMI). This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of a behavioral weight loss intervention enhanced with peer support and mobile health (mHealth) technology for obese individuals with SMI.

    Methods

    The Diabetes Prevention Program Group Lifestyle Balance intervention enhanced with peer support and mHealth technology was implemented in a public mental health setting. Thirteen obese individuals with SMI participated in a pre-post pilot study of the 24-week intervention. Feasibility was assessed by program attendance, and participant satisfaction and suggestions for improving the model. Descriptive changes in weight and fitness were also explored.

    Results

    Overall attendance amounted to approximately half (56%) of weekly sessions. At 6-month follow-up, 45% of participants had lost weight, and 45% showed improved fitness by increasing their walking distance. Participants suggested a number of modifications to increase the relevance of the intervention for people with SMI, including less didactic instruction and more active learning, a simplified dietary component, more in depth technology training, and greater attention to mental health.

    Conclusions

    The principles of standard behavioral weight loss treatment provide a useful starting point for promoting weight loss in people with SMI. However, adaptions to standard weight loss curricula are needed to enhance engagement, participation, and outcomes to respond to the unique challenges of individuals with SMI.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files