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Development and Pilot Testing of a Psychosocial Intervention Program for Young Breast Cancer Survivors
  • Published Date:
    Oct 09 2015
  • Source:
    Patient Educ Couns. 99(3):414-420.


Public Access Version Available on: March 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26456635
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4779394
  • Funding:
    1U58DP003429/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    R25 CA087949/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R25CA 87949/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    U58 DP003429/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objective

    To describe the development, pilot testing, and dissemination of a psychosocial intervention addressing concerns of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS).

    Methods

    Intervention development included needs assessment with community organizations and interviews with YBCS. Based on evidence-based models of treatment, the intervention included tools for managing anxiety, fear of recurrence, tools for decision-making, and coping with sexuality/ relationship issues. After pilot testing in a university setting, the program was disseminated to two community clinical settings.

    Results

    The program has two distinct modules (anxiety management and relationships/sexuality) that were delivered in two sessions; however, due to attrition, an all day workshop evolved. An author constructed questionnaire was used for pre- and post-intervention evaluation. Post-treatment scores showed an average increase of 2.7 points on a 10 point scale for the first module, and a 2.3 point increase for the second module. Qualitative feedback surveys were also collected. The two community sites demonstrated similar gains among their participants.

    Conclusions

    The intervention satisfies an unmet need for YBCS and is a possible model of integrating psychosocial intervention with oncology care.

    Practice Implications

    This program developed standardized materials which can be disseminated to other organizations and potentially online for implementation within community settings.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files