Welcome to CDC Stacks | Influence of Patient, Physician, and Hospital Characteristics on the Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Care for Inflammatory Breast Cancer - 37858 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Influence of Patient, Physician, and Hospital Characteristics on the Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Care for Inflammatory Breast Cancer
  • Published Date:
    Nov 21 2015
  • Source:
    Cancer Epidemiol. 40:7-14.


Public Access Version Available on: February 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26605428
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4738104
  • Funding:
    P30 CA014520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    P30CA014520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    T32 GM008692/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
    T32GM008692/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
    TL1 TR000429/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    U01 DP000261/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U01DP000261/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    UL1 TR000427/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Purpose

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer for which treatments vary, so we sought to identify factors that affect the receipt of guideline-concordant care.

    Methods

    Patients diagnosed with IBC in 2004 were identified from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Data Quality and Patterns of Care Study, containing information from cancer registries in seven states. Variation in guideline-concordant care for IBC, based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, was assessed according to patient, physician, and hospital characteristics.

    Results

    Of the 107 IBC patients in the study without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, only 25.8% received treatment concordant with guidelines. Predictors of non-concordance included patient age (≥70 years), non-white race, normal body mass index (BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2), patients with physicians graduating from medical school >15 years prior, and smaller hospital size (<200 beds). IBC patients survived longer if they received guideline-concordant treatment based on either 2003 (p=0.06) or 2013 (p=0.06) NCCN guidelines.

    Conclusions

    Targeting factors associated with receipt of care that is not guideline-concordant may reduce survival disparities in IBC patients. Prompt referral for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiation therapy is also crucial.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files