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ASSESSMENT OF YOUTUBE VIDEOS AS A SOURCE OF INFORMATION ON MEDICATION USE IN PREGNANCY
Filetype[PDF - 1.11 MB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26541372
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4707975
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Background

    When making decisions about medication use in pregnancy, women consult many information sources, including the Internet. The aim of this study was to assess the content of publicly-accessible YouTube videos that discuss medication use in pregnancy.

    Methods

    Using 2,023 distinct combinations of search terms related to medications and pregnancy, we extracted metadata from YouTube videos using a YouTube video Application Programming Interface. Relevant videos were defined as those with a medication search term and a pregnancy-related search term in either the video title or description. We viewed relevant videos and abstracted content from each video into a database. We documented whether videos implied each medication to be ‘safe’ or ‘unsafe’ in pregnancy and compared that assessment with the medication’s Teratogen Information System (TERIS) rating.

    Results

    After viewing 651 videos, 314 videos with information about medication use in pregnancy were available for the final analyses. The majority of videos were from law firms (67%), television segments (10%), or physicians (8%). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were the most common medication class named (225 videos, 72%), and 88% percent of videos about SSRIs indicated they were ‘unsafe’ for use in pregnancy. However, the TERIS ratings for medication products in this class range from ‘unlikely’ to ‘minimal’ teratogenic risk.

    Conclusion

    For the majority of medications, current YouTube video content does not adequately reflect what is known about the safety of their use in pregnancy and should be interpreted cautiously. However, YouTube could serve as a valuable platform for communicating evidence-based medication safety information.