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Congenital adrenal hyperplasia cases identified by newborn screening in one- and two-screen states
Filetype[PDF - 238.84 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26296712
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4640991
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
    1U50HK000105/HK/PHITPO CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    There is no clear consensus among state newborn screening programs on whether routine second screening of newborns identifies clinically relevant cases of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. This retrospective study evaluated laboratory practices, along with biochemical and medical characteristics of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) cases (1) detected on the first newborn screen in one-screen compared to two-screen states, and (2) detected on the first versus the second screen in the two-screen states, to determine the effectiveness of a second screen. A total of 374 confirmed cases of CAH from 2 one-screen states and 5 two-screen states were included in this study. Demographic data and diagnostic information on each reported case were collected and analyzed. Additionally, laboratory data, including screening methodologies and algorithms, were evaluated. The one-screen states reported 99 cases of CAH out of 1,740,586 (1 in 17,500) newborns screened: 88 (89%) identified on the first screen and 5 (5%) identified on the targeted second screen. The two-screen states reported 275 cases of CAH out of 2,629,627 (1 in 9500) newborns screened: 165 (60%) identified on the first screen and 99 (36%) identified on the second screen. Using a multivariate model, the only significant predictor of whether a case was identified on the first or the second screen in the two-screen states was the type of CAH. Compared with classical salt-wasting CAH, classical simple virilizing and non-classical CAH cases were less likely to be detected on the first versus the second screen. The routine second newborn screen is important for identifying children with CAH, particularly simple virilizing and non-classical forms, which might otherwise not be captured through a single screen.