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Connectedness and Perceived Burdensomeness among Adolescents at Elevated Suicide Risk: An Examination of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicidal Behavior
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25751375
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4665648
  • Funding:
    K24 MH077705/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    K24 MH077705/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    U01 CE001940/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
    U01-CE-001940-01/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objective

    The interpersonal theory of suicidal behavior emphasizes the constructs of perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and acquired capacity, which warrant investigation in adolescents at-risk for suicide due to interpersonal stressors.

    Methods

    This study examined one component of the interpersonal theory of suicidal behavior, “suicidal desire” (suicidal ideation), in 129 adolescents (12–15 years) recruited from a general medical emergency department who screened positive for bully victimization, bully perpetration, or low interpersonal connectedness.

    Results

    Greater perceived burdensomeness combined with low family connectedness was a significant predictor of suicidal ideation.

    Conclusion

    This suggests the importance of addressing connectedness and perceptions of burdensomeness in prevention and early intervention efforts with at-risk adolescents.