Welcome to CDC Stacks | Fabrication of Freestanding Alginate Microfibers and Microstructures for Tissue Engineering Applications - 30079 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Fabrication of Freestanding Alginate Microfibers and Microstructures for Tissue Engineering Applications
  • Published Date:
    Apr 03 2014
  • Source:
    Biofabrication. 6(2):024104.
Filetype[PDF - 1.27 MB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24695323
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4130459
  • Funding:
    1DP2HL117750/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    2T32EB003392/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
    DP2 HL117750/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    T32 EB003392/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Natural biopolymers such as alginate have become important materials for a variety of biotechnology applications including drug delivery, cell encapsulation and tissue engineering. This expanding use has spurred the development of new approaches to engineer these materials at the nano- and microscales to better control cell interactions. Here we describe a method to fabricate freestanding alginate-based microfibers and microstructures with tunable geometries down to approximately 3 µm. To do this, a polydimethylsiloxane stamp is used to micromold alginate or alginate-fibrin blends onto a sacrificial layer of thermally-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm). A warm calcium chloride solution is then used to crosslink the alginate and, upon cooling below the lower critical solution temperature (~32 °C), the PIPAAm layer dissolves and releases the alginate or alginate-fibrin as freestanding microfibers and microstructures. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that C2C12 myoblasts seeded onto the alginate-fibrin microfibers polarize along the fiber length forming interconnected cell strands. Thus, we have developed the ability to engineer alginate-based microstructured materials that can selectively bind cells and direct cellular assembly.