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Use of Contrast-Enhanced Sonography to Investigate Intraneural Vascularity in a Cohort of Macaca fascicularis With Suspected Median Mononeuropathy
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24371104
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4040227
  • Funding:
    UL1 TR001070/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    5R21OH009907-02/OH/NIOSH CDC HHS/United States
    UL1RR025755/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    R21 OH009907/OH/NIOSH CDC HHS/United States
    K12 HD055929/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 RR025755/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    K12HD055929/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objectives

    The purpose of this study was to provide clinical evidence of the use of contrast-enhanced sonography in detecting and quantifying changes in intraneural vascularity due to median mononeuropathy.

    Methods

    Five Macaca fascicularis monkeys were exposed to 20 weeks of repetitive work to increase their risk of developing median mononeuropathy. Contrast-enhanced sonograms were obtained in 30-second increments for 7 minutes while a contrast agent was being delivered. Data were collected immediately at the conclusion of the 20-week work exposure and then again during a recovery phase approximately 3 months after the completion of work. Quantitative analysis and trend graphs were used to analyze median nerve perfusion intensity. This study also compared the use of both manual counting of pixels and semiautomatic measurement using specialized software.

    Results

    Based on the average data, maximum intensity values were identified as the best indicators of nerve hyperemia. Paired t tests demonstrated significantly higher maximum intensities in the working stage for 4 of the 5 subjects (P < .01).

    Conclusions

    This study provides preliminary evidence that (1) in a controlled exposure model, a change in intraneural vascularity of the median nerve between working and recovery can be observed; (2) this vascular change can be measured using an objective technique that quantifies the intensity of vascularity; and (3) contrast-enhanced sonography may improve the ability to reliably capture and measure low-flow microvascularity.