Welcome to CDC Stacks | Understanding administrative evidence-based practices: Findings from a survey of local health department leaders - 29924 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Understanding administrative evidence-based practices: Findings from a survey of local health department leaders
Filetype[PDF - 228.57 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24355671
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3982585
  • Funding:
    P30 DK092950/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    U48/DP001903/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    UL1 TR000448/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Background

    There are sparse data showing the extent to which evidence-based public health is occurring among local health departments.

    Purpose

    The purpose of the study was to describe the patterns and predictors of administrative evidence-based practices (structures and activities that are associated with performance measures) in a representative sample of local health departments in the United States.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional study of 517 local health department directors was conducted from October through December 2012 (analysis in January through March 2013). The questions on administrative evidence-based practices included 19 items based on a recent literature review (five broad domains: workforce development, leadership, organizational climate and culture, relationships and partnerships, financial processes).

    Results

    There was a wide range in performance among the 19 individual administrative evidence-based practices, ranging from 35% for access to current information on evidence-based practices to 96% for funding via a variety of sources Among the five domains, values were generally lowest for organizational climate and culture (mean for the domain = 49.9%) and highest for relationships and partnerships (mean for the domain = 77.1%). Variables associated with attaining the highest tertile of administrative evidence-based practices included having a population jurisdiction of 25,000 or larger (adjusted odds ratios (aORs) ranging from 4.4 to 7.5) and state governance structure (aOR=3.1).

    Conclusions

    This report on the patterns and predictors of administrative evidence-based practices in health departments begins to provide information on gaps and areas for improvement that can be linked with ongoing quality improvement processes.