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3D Graphene Oxide-encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles to Detect Neural Stem Cell Differentiation
Filetype[PDF - 1.37 MB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    23937915
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3810476
  • Funding:
    1DP20D006462-01/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    DP2 OD006462/OD/NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Monitoring of stem cell differentiation and pluripotency is an important step for the practical use of stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine. Hence, a new non-destructive detection tool capable of in situ monitoring of stem cell differentiation is highly needed. In this study, we report a 3D graphene oxide-encapsulated gold nanoparticle that is very effective for the detection of the differentiation potential of neural stem cells (NSCs) based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A new material, 3D GO-encapsulated gold nanoparticle, is developed to induce the double enhancement effect of graphene oxide and gold nanoparticle on SERS signals which is only effective for undifferentiated NSCs. The Raman peaks achieved from undifferentiated NSCs on the graphene oxide (GO)-encapsulated gold nanoparticles were 3.5 times higher than peaks obtained from normal metal structures and were clearly distinguishable from those of differentiated cells. The number of CC bonds and the Raman intensity at 1656 cm(-1) was found to show a positive correlation, which matches the differentiation state of the NSCs. Moreover, the substrate composed of 3D GO-encapsulated gold nanoparticles was also effective at distinguishing the differentiation state of single NSC by using electrochemical and electrical techniques. Hence, the proposed technique can be used as a powerful non-destructive in situ monitoring tool for the identification of the differentiation potential of various kinds of stem cells (mesenchymal, hematopoietic, and neural stem cells).