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Random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a digital micromirror device
  • Published Date:
    Aug 1 2013
  • Source:
    Opt Lett. 2013; 38(15):2683-2686.
Filetype[PDF - 866.30 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    23903111
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3784350
  • Funding:
    DP1 EB016986/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    DP1 EB016986/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA134539/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA134539/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA157277/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA157277/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA159959/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA159959/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 EB008085/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
    R01 EB008085/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
    R01 EB010049/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
    R01 EB010049/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
    T32 EB014855/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
    U54 CA136398/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    U54 CA136398/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    We developed random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a digital micromirror device. This system can rapidly scan arbitrarily shaped regions of interest within a 40 μm×40 μm imaging area with a lateral resolution of 3.6 μm. To identify a region of interest, a global structural image is first acquired, then the selected region is scanned. The random-access ability was demonstrated by imaging two static samples, a carbon fiber cross and a monolayer of red blood cells, with an acquisition rate up to 4 kHz. The system was then used to monitor blood flow in vivo in real time within user-selected capillaries in a mouse ear. By imaging only the capillary of interest, the frame rate was increased by up to 9.2 times.